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ilovereveiller:





WUNDERBLOCK







That’s spray painted dirt, an installation titled Wunderblock by Katharina Grosse. It’s up for one more day (today!) at the Nasher Sculpture Center, so if you’re in the Dallas area, go walk around on it while you still have the chance. The other two massive and colorful, rock-like objects in the exhibit will be on view through September 1.
Sep 20, 2013 / 4 notes

ilovereveiller:

WUNDERBLOCK

That’s spray painted dirt, an installation titled Wunderblock by Katharina Grosse. It’s up for one more day (today!) at the Nasher Sculpture Center, so if you’re in the Dallas area, go walk around on it while you still have the chance. The other two massive and colorful, rock-like objects in the exhibit will be on view through September 1.

tracksuitsandtrumpets:

Katharina Grosse
Sep 20, 2013 / 2 notes

tracksuitsandtrumpets:

Katharina Grosse

near-and-dear:

Alicia Martin
Sep 20, 2013 / 51 notes

near-and-dear:

Alicia Martin

graffitiandstardust:

Moonrise Kingdom
Sep 20, 2013 / 9 notes

graffitiandstardust:

Moonrise Kingdom

Sep 20, 2013 / 43 notes
Sep 20, 2013 / 8 notes
Jun 27, 2013 / 18 notes
breakingnews:

Mouse cloned from single drop of blood
PTI: Scientists have for the first time cloned a mouse from a single drop of blood.
Researchers used circulating blood cells collected from the tail of a donor mouse to produce the clone. The female mouse cloned from a peripheral leukocyte proved to be fertile by natural mating, and lived for a normal lifespan, researchers said.
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, devised a technique to avoid the diminishing returns of recloning the same cell. Success rates increased from the standard three per cent in first-generation clones to ten per cent in first-generation and 14 per cent in higher-generation clones, researchers said.
Photo credit: AFP
Jun 27, 2013 / 2,012 notes

breakingnews:

Mouse cloned from single drop of blood


PTI: Scientists have for the first time cloned a mouse from a single drop of blood.

Researchers used circulating blood cells collected from the tail of a donor mouse to produce the clone. The female mouse cloned from a peripheral leukocyte proved to be fertile by natural mating, and lived for a normal lifespan, researchers said.

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, devised a technique to avoid the diminishing returns of recloning the same cell. Success rates increased from the standard three per cent in first-generation clones to ten per cent in first-generation and 14 per cent in higher-generation clones, researchers said.

Photo credit: AFP

(via science-junkie)

Jun 18, 2013 / 41 notes
Jun 18, 2013 / 804 notes